Difficult verses in the ‘Christmas’ story, p.1

This is the time of year when most of Christendom is focused on the advent of the Messiah of Israel, commonly called Christmas and the birth of Jesus Christ.  In churches and in homes Scriptures from the Old and New Testament will be read that detail the coming of the Long Expected One.  Most of us have heard these verses so many times that they almost flow off of our tongues as they are being read to us…  We know the flow and the rhythm to the point that they offer incredible comfort.  A halcyon warmth embraces us and we float on the river of sweet memories and blessed promises.  But, do we really pay attention?

Have you ever noticed that there are some verses in these beloved Scriptures that really really challenge the historical understanding of the story and at times confront even major tenets in the theological narrative of Christendom?  Over the next week I hope to explore a few of these difficult verses, not to be antagonistic, but to ask, ‘shouldn’t we look a little deeper, and through an Hebraic lens, to understand the context of Scripture and rightly understand who we are in the Messiah?’  Please take a few minutes and ‘walk with me’ as we consider some of these verses over the next few days.


Blameless

Christendom generally teaches that the Law (Torah, God’s Instructions) was too heavy a burden for people to bear and since nobody could keep it this created the need for Jesus to come ‘fulfill’ it for us.  Then, we read in the ‘Christmas story,’

Luke 1:There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judaea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia: and his wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elisabeth. And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless.

Have you ever noticed that last bolded phrase?  Continue reading “Difficult verses in the ‘Christmas’ story, p.1”